"Camborne School of Mines’ brilliant alumni network and indisputable reputation in the industry, have provided me with the best possible start after leaving university.”
Kasia Drinkwater, MSc Surveying, Land and Environmental Management, 2014

Camborne School of Mines is a world-class combined mining school and geoscience department, rich in history and culture for over 125 years. We provide academic education and professional training in geoscience and mining for our many students, as well as offering a number of unique and innovative programmes designed for individuals working within the extraction industries. Our research covers a range of geoscience subjects, and focuses on many key areas including past environmental change, volcanic hazards, deep Earth processes, intelligent mining, efficiency and safety, critical raw materials, and sustainable mining. We have a long history of successful partnerships with both national and international companies and projects, playing a vital role by providing innovative solutions to global energy, natural resource, and environmental issues.

Prof Kip Jeffrey - Head of Camborne School of Mines

Latest news

Man Engine wins national lottery arts award

An eleven metre tall mechanical puppet has been named as the best arts project in the UK, following a campaign supported by .

CSM graduates join prestigious mining company

Graduates from the Camborne School of Mines will launch their fledgling careers with one of the world’s most successful and prestigious mining companies.

Research reveals West Antarctic Ice Sheet loss over the last 11,000 years

Wind-driven incursions of warm water have forced the retreat of glaciers in West Antarctica over the last millennia, new research has revealed.

CSM calls for public to vote for Man Engine awards bid

The Camborne School of Mines is giving its support to a high-profile award bid that will resurrect a unique mechanical puppet, designed to celebrate Cornwall’s prestigious mining heritage.

Volcanic eruptions triggered dawn of the dinosaurs, research shows

Huge pulses of volcanic activity are likely to have played a key role in triggering the end Triassic mass extinction, which set the scene for the rise and age of the dinosaurs, new research has found.

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