Microwave metamaterials

This research theme encompasses:

  • Metasurfaces and surface waves
  • 3D metamaterials and photonic crystals
  • Compact and functional antennas
  • Resonators and energy harvesting structures
  • Filtering, absorbing and channelling microwave energy
  • Active metamaterials

Explore our college research theme page to learn more about our expertise in microwave metamaterials.

 

Current projects and academic expertise

StudentResearch projectSupervisors
(University of Exeter)
Milo Baraclough Microwave metamaterials as models of molecular light harvesting systems

Professor Bill Barnes

Dr Ian Hooper

Julia Dautova Scattering and localisation of microwave surface waves

Professor Alastair Hibbins

Professor Roy Sambles

Julia de Pineda Gutierrez Exploration of beam shaping at microwave frequencies using metasurfaces and metamaterials

Professor Roy Sambles

Professor Alastair Hibbins

Oliver Latcham Excitation of spin waves in magnetic elements using surface acoustic waves

Professor Volodymyr Kruglyak

Professor Geoff Nash

Dr Tom Wayward

Katie Lewis Advanced Magnetic Materials for Radio, Microwave and Millimetre-wave applications

Professor Alastair Hibbins

Professor Roy Sambles

Dr Isaac Luxmoore

Pavel Petrov Design and characterisation of 3D metamaterials fabricated using additive manufacturing

Professor Roy Sambles

Professor Alastair Hibbins

 

Past Projects

StudentProject Title

Supervisors
(University of Exeter)

Lauren Barr Chiral and magneto-optical phenomena in the near field of metamaterials

Professor Euan Hendry

Professor Alastair Hibbins

Miguel Camacho Aguilar Thin metal multilayers for microwave applications

Professor Alastair Hibbins

Professor Roy Sambles

Sathya Sai Seetharaman Hyperbolic meta-materials and the emission of EM radiation

Professor Bill Barnes

Dr Ian Hooper

Research case study: Direct observation of topologically protected modes in a microwave metamaterial

"This year I worked on a project with our collaborators in Birmingham on a very interesting kind of metamaterial. We created a material that supports an electromagnetic wave that can travel in only one direction - the wave is topoligically protected.

This is useful for communication networks, as when a wave of this kind travels around a corner, or over a defect, it won't be scattered backwards, so there is no loss of signal. The metamaterial has a tri-layer unit cell."

Lauren Barr, Cohort 2014

Read the case study »