Photo of Dr Steven Hepplestone

Dr Steven Hepplestone

Lecturer (E&R)

Email:

Telephone: 01392 723048

Extension: (Streatham) 3048

 

Steven Hepplestone is a theoretical physicist with a broad range of interests in quantum mechanics and its applications to materials, with a focus on the nanoscale.

Steven Hepplestone's current research areas are:

Energy storage

The current focus here is on the potential of colossal permittivity materials.  In joint colloboration with Deregallera, my research is focused on tackling the potential of these materials to form a new type of energy storage.

Energy conversion

Thermoelectrics represent an intriguing possibility of turning heat directly into electricity.  However, these materials are held back by being vast inefficiency. Using the latest techniques in theoretical physics, it is hoped that material can be designed at the nanoscale to produce a thermoelectric of high efficiency.   In the past I have shown that the drop in thermal conductivity of multilayered nanofilms (known as superlattices) is due to the intermixing of atoms across the interface and the change in local bonds due to the lattice mismatch and strain.  It is hoped that by controlling these mechanisms, an optimal thermoelectric can be found.

Interfaces

Given that interfaces govern the design of everything we build and design, it is often surprising to realise quite how poorly we understand their properties.  In addition, these interfaces present opportunities to engineer and create properties one cannot see in normal solids, such superconductivity, ultrahigh resistances, unusual optical effects and more. 

Memristors

The unique properties of both phase change materials as well as highly defective systems allow the possiblity of resistors whose properties change depending on their previous history.    (More to come)

Nanostructures

(More to come)

 

Crystal growth at the atomic level

Steven uses first principles calculations and empirical based approaches to help develop understand how one can influence and control the growth of crystalline materials and nanostructures at the atomic level. (more to come)

Nanoscale electronics

I have extensive experience in modelling nanoscale electronic components, be they transistors, capacitors or other components.  If you are interested in developing these devices and are looking for advice and/or colloboration, please feel welcome to contact me.

I currently have PhD positions available.  One of which is listed here:

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/studying/funding/award/?id=2153

Please get in contact if you are interested in working on this exciting project.

 

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