New research could trigger revolution in computer electronics manufacturing

A pioneering new technique to produce cutting-edge, versatile microchips could revolutionize the speed, efficiency and capability of the next generation of computers.

Breakthrough in graphene production could trigger revolution in artificial skin development

A pioneering new technique to produce high-quality, low cost graphene could pave the way for the development of the first truly flexible ‘electronic skin’, that could be used in robots.

Graphene holds key to unlocking creation of wearable electronic devices

Ground-breaking research has successfully created the world’s first truly electronic textile, using the wonder material Graphene.

GraphExeter defies the Achilles heel of wonder material graphene

A resilience to extreme conditions by the most transparent, lightweight and flexible material for conducting electricity could help revolutionise the electronic industry, according to a new study.

CEMPS research rated internationally excellent in latest national assessment

CEMPS research has been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the first assessment of the research quality of UK universities since 2008, the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Revolutionary new device joins world of smart electronics

Unique properties of graphene and graphExeter combine to create a new flexible, transparent, photosensitive device.

New graphene-based material could revolutionise electronics industry

The most transparent, lightweight and flexible material ever for conducting electricity has been invented by a team from the University of Exeter.

Long predicted atomic collapse state observed in graphene

The first experimental observation of a phenomenon in quantum mechanics that was predicted nearly 70 years ago holds important implications for the future of graphene-based electronic devices.

£1.1 million will help develop products from super-material

New ways of making and using the wonder material graphene will be identified through pioneering work by engineers and scientists at the University of Exeter and Bath.